Corn Posts

  • Sulfur Important for Corn Production

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    Categories:
    Corn

    Article provided by PRIDE Seeds. Written by Drew Thompson, PRIDE Seeds Market Development Agronomist The vast majority of producers understand the need/importance of sulfur for optimal corn yields, and most are targeting a ratio of 10-12:1 for N:S. This means that for every 10-12 lb/ac of N applied to their corn crop, they will aim to have 1 lb/ac of sulfur - so an N rate of 180 lb/ac would have 15-20 lb/ac of sulfur.

  • Goss’ Wilt in Manitoba: Everything You Need to Know

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    Categories:
    Disease
    ,
    Corn

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. Nebraskensis (CMN), which is a bit of a mouthful, is more commonly known as Goss’ Wilt. It was first discovered in Manitoba in 2009 near Roland, and in 2013 near Lethbridge and Taber, Alberta. In the next two decades, the bacteria that causes Goss’ Wilt is expected to be in almost every corn field in Western Canada. Unfortunately, the bacteria is hard to get rid of, but the damage it causes is preventable.

  • The Impact of Boron on Corn

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    Categories:
    Agronomy
    ,
    Corn

    This post is from our partners at PRIDE Seeds. In this photo, the cob on the bottom shows the obvious impact of a boron deficiency.  In late August, PRIDE Seeds agronomist Drew Thompson was called to visit a grower’s corn field where the complaint was ears that were small, misshapen and poorly pollinated.  The grower was frustrated, but also confused as the same seed had been planted into another field, a few concessions away with a different soil and crop history, but the same fertility and agronomic program. “The other field looked just great,” said Thompson, with near perfect pollination and big, boast-worthy cobs. “What was going on,” he wondered.

  • Feed Face-off: Corn vs. Barley

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    Categories:
    Barley
    ,
    Corn

    As a seed company, CANTERRA SEEDS has a full portfolio of pedigreed varieties including cereals, pulses and special crops, in addition to corn, soybeans and canola. While we like to think of ourselves as a team, sometimes representatives from different parts of our portfolio differ in opinion on key items. Take for example this recent debate on the merits of corn vs. barley as a feed.

  • PRIDE Seeds Tops Competitors in Grazing Trial

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    Categories:
    Results
    ,
    Corn

    Grazing trials can be tough, so we're pleased to receive these third party results. Grazing trials can be tough to do. Typically, these trials rely on anecdotal evidence to measure the performance of each corn hybrid, as opposed to scientific measurement. Statements like “the cows seem to like this one better,” or “they fed off this one longer,” are difficult to quantify. While we value all trials and the cooperators that run them, getting systematic, third party results helps verify the strength of the PRIDE Seeds products.