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    Four different staging methods have been developed to stage corn plants. Crop staging is used to assess crop development, and make herbicide, fungicide, and fertility application recommendations, and different companies use different methods for application recommendations. Are you savvy on staging? Read more for information about the four corn staging methods.

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    Article provided by PRIDE Seeds. Written by Drew Thompson, PRIDE Seeds Market Development Agronomist The vast majority of producers understand the need/importance of sulfur for optimal corn yields, and most are targeting a ratio of 10-12:1 for N:S. This means that for every 10-12 lb/ac of N applied to their corn crop, they will aim to have 1 lb/ac of sulfur - so an N rate of 180 lb/ac would have 15-20 lb/ac of sulfur.

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    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. Nebraskensis (CMN), which is a bit of a mouthful, is more commonly known as Goss’ Wilt. It was first discovered in Manitoba in 2009 near Roland, and in 2013 near Lethbridge and Taber, Alberta. In the next two decades, the bacteria that causes Goss’ Wilt is expected to be in almost every corn field in Western Canada. Unfortunately, the bacteria is hard to get rid of, but the damage it causes is preventable.

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    This post is from our partners at PRIDE Seeds. In this photo, the cob on the bottom shows the obvious impact of a boron deficiency.  In late August, PRIDE Seeds agronomist Drew Thompson was called to visit a grower’s corn field where the complaint was ears that were small, misshapen and poorly pollinated.  The grower was frustrated, but also confused as the same seed had been planted into another field, a few concessions away with a different soil and crop history, but the same fertility and agronomic program. “The other field looked just great,” said Thompson, with near perfect pollination and big, boast-worthy cobs. “What was going on,” he wondered.

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    Goss's Wilt is showing up in Manitoba and Alberta. What can you do to stop the disease on your farm? Goss’s Wilt is a bacterial disease in corn, caused by the bacterium, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. Nebraskensis (CMN). It was first found in Nebraska in 1969, and has since spread across the corn-growing regions of the US. In the last decade, the disease has arrived in Canada.

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